TIPS & IDEAS

TIP OF THE MONTH

Don’t know which oil to choose? Corn oil is ideal for high-heat applications, Canola is a great all-purpose option, while vegetable oil is best for low heat or baking applications.

BAKING

Craving caramel? Use Golden Corn Syrup to add depth to the flavour & to prevent the sugar from crystallizing.

BAKING

Don't have cake flour handy? Make your own! For each 1 cup, add 2 tbsp. of Fleischmann's® Corn Starch in a dry measuring cup and fill the remainder with all-purpose flour.

Household

Mix 1 cup of golden corn syrup with 1 cup of water and your fresh Christmas tree will last longer.

Baking

When slicing yeast breads, use a serrated knife and a gentle "sawing" motion to get beautiful slices!

Baking

If you get interrupted while yeast bread is raising and need to slow down the process, cover the dough with plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to 6 hours. When you are ready to continue, let dough continue to rise at room temperature if needed, OR if the dough has doubled, go ahead and proceed with the next step of the recipe.

Cooking

When adding corn starch to hot liquids such as soups or sauces, mix the corn starch with a little cold water first, then add to the hot soup. This will prevent lumps!

Storage

Once a jar of yeast is opened, use within 6 months regardless of the Best By date. Tip: Write the date you opened the jar on the label.

Cooking

Not sure which cooking oil to use? In most cases, corn, canola, and vegetable oils can be used interchangeably.

Cooking

When thickening gravies and sauces, corn starch can be substituted for flour. Use just half as much corn starch as flour. For example, if your recipe calls for 2 tablespoons of flour, use 1 tablespoon of corn starch.

Baking

Using a convection oven? It is easy to convert standard baking time into convection baking time. You have 2 choices: 1). Lower the oven temperature by 25 degrees and bake for the same amount of time OR 2). Shorten baking time by about 20% and keep the oven temperature as called for in the recipe.

Cooking

Boil and peel with ease. Cool boiled eggs in a bowl of ice water as soon as they’re removed from the pot. This helps them peel easier.

Cooking

Temper temper! If your recipe says to “temper” the eggs, simply whisk a bit of hot liquid into the eggs to warm them up before adding to the hot ingredients. This way, they’ll add a creamy texture instead of coming up scrambled.

Cooking

Pairs well with others. Cream, butter and cheese not only complement the flavour of eggs, their fat counteracts curdling. Keep this in mind the next time you make hollandaise sauce or egg casserole!

Cooking

Keep a close watch. Eggs can go from raw to cooked in just a minute or two, so watch them closely to avoid overcooking.

Meats

Let it rest. Remove the brisket when it hits five degrees below the desired internal temperature (145°F). It will continue cooking after you remove it from the heat. A 15-20 minute rest allows the juices to redistribute.

Roasting

Keep it under wraps. Cover the roasting pan with foil to keep the moisture in the brisket and not all over the inside of your oven.

Roasting

Assess your roasting pan. A sturdy pan with large handles for pulling the brisket out of the oven is best. High sides will help keep the air circulating – a plus!

Roasting

Fat is flavour. In moderation. Well-marbled brisket will stay moist and flavourful throughout the roasting (or smoking) process. Be sure to cut off the fat cap – a.k.a. the large piece of fat on top – before roasting.

Meats

Keep the flavour going. Buying bone-in ham leaves you with the ham bone – great for flavouring soups and beans.

Meats

For an easy ham glaze, combine 1 cup golden syrup + 1/3 cup brown sugar + 1/4 cup brown mustard. Brush glaze on ham during last 30 minutes of cooking.